How We Do Theology

Members of the Appalachian Riders for Our Lady are encouraged to introduce themselves as theologians. However, we are theologians in the unique style of our order with our work guided by, in addition to the basic character of our order, these four principles:

  1. Do theology for the milieu in which you are embedded.
  2. Ground your work in your particular booklist.
  3. Our theology is based on conversation rather than writing.
  4. Be patient.

 

Posted in Church | Leave a comment

Commitment, Continuity, and Conversation

The particular spirituality of the Appalachian Riders For Our Lady is based on our three foundational principles of commitment, continuity and conversation in addition to the general Catholic evangelical counsels of poverty, chastity, obedience and stability adapted to a lay context. The Riders strive to promote a conversational culture, proclaiming Christ crucified, authentically Christian and Catholic, in the midst of a world largely lacking culture of any sort.  Our vows of commitment, continuity, and conversation do not necessarily mean that we have any natural inclination or talent in these areas. My booklist, which is in a way deep in history (each Rider, during their novitiate, settles on at most 24 books of primary importance), is:

  • Bible, unabridged Revised Standard Version
  • The Liturgy of the Hours, unabridged
  • Plato: Complete Works; ed John Cooper
  • Vergil’s Aeneid; Sarah Ruden translation
  • The Confessions; by Saint Augustine
  • Summa Theologica; St Thomas Aquinas
  • Dante’s Divine Comedy; Anthony Esolen
  • Twenty Two Plays;  William Shakespeare
  • Complete English Poems; John Donne
  • Collected Poetry & Prose; Robert Frost
  • The Oxford Book of English Verse; Ricks
  • The Oldest Alphabet; Douglas Petrovich
  • The Conservative Mind; Russell Kirk
  • The Catholic Church; David Anders
  • Is God Happy; Leszek Kolakowski
  • Between Two Millstones; Solzhenitsyn
  • Isaiah: the Church’s Bible; R L Wilken
  • Veritatis Splendor; Pope John Paul II
  • Compendium of the Catholic Catechism

The Appalachian Riders For Our Lady have a particular interest in the season of Ascensiontide, which we consider nearly as important as Advent and Lent.  My particular interest is: That ecclesial bodies with very different ecclesiology seem to have very similar Christology.  Emphasis on “seem”. 

wasatch

Thomas Gwyn and MaryAlice Dunbar

Christian Perspectives

The foundation of everything is Christ Jesus, and him crucified. However, beyond the personal aspects of that, what are the implications for our social relationships?

I want to commend the Catholic perspective to you. Of course, that raises several questions:

  • Is it reasonable to speak of THE Catholic perspective?
  • Is my characterization of this perspective warranted?
  • Can one also speak of THE Protestant perspective, especially given the range of protestant ecclesial bodies?

I propose that the protestant perspective is that the Christian life is best lived and considered from the primary viewpoint of the individual or, at most, the congregation. On the other hand, I commend the Catholic perspective: the Christian life is best lived and considered from the primary viewpoint of the universal Church, the Bride of Christ, extended in spacetime and militantly subsisting in the Catholic Church whose chief steward is the bishop of Rome. Besides addressing those preliminary questions, I intend to commend the Catholic perspective in three aspects:

  • better able to cope with adversity
  • more resources for spiritual formation
  • closer alignment with the scriptural canon

All these points are controversial; however, I intend not to argue for them but rather to chew on them.  The difference between a primarily individual perspective and a primarily ecclesial perspective also has a significant political component since the State desires no competitor to its hegemony (see, for example, Alan Jacobs biography of The Book of Common Prayer which documents how this worked out in England) and hence is inclined to favor an individual perspective which it can divide and conquer.

I’m also assuming that the more alive an entity, the more applicable the principle that the whole is more than the sum of its parts. In addition, whenever possible I’d like to phrase matters sociologically rather than soteriologically. A major advantage of a perspective more social than individual is that one can “check one’s answers”– the boredom of, for example, discussion about end-time scenarios or sectarian doctrine being that one can not check one’s theory in one’s day to day life and interactions with others as one can, on the other hand, regarding ethics and how to live in community.

On a personal level, I think the core of the Protestant error centers on the attempt to place faith above love (see Luther’s commentary on Galatians) contra Saint Paul and the Catholic tradition.

The noted Evangelical scholar Mark Noll, in the book ‘Is the Reformation Over’, argues that Catholic and Protestant disagreements really come down to different understandings of the nature of the Church.  I don’t disagree; however, I very much disagree with the view that “well, maybe so but that’s not important to me..it’s my personal relationship with God that is important.”  The nature of the Church is essentially intertwined with the work of the Holy Spirit, as is reflected in the Nicene creed.  God is able to sustain what was initially established (..I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it) and it is wrong-headed to try to start over on one’s own.

Technology is very important and clearly the most important technology is language. The people who know the most about language are not the philosophers but the poets, broadly defined.

“Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.” (Richard Feynman)

“If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is.” (John von Neumann)

“Don’t get involved in partial problems, but always take flight to where there is a free view over the whole single great problem, even if this view is still not a clear one.” (Ludwig Wittgenstein)

“The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” (William Faulkner)

“If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?” (Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn)

 

Posted in Church, Currents | Tagged | 2 Comments

Sermons

I’ve listened to, on average, at least one sermon or homily every week for the last forty years. I continue to look forward to: a coherent exposition of the Scriptures, increasing my understanding and actualization of passages with which I have some familiarity and often opening up passages that somehow had not struck me before. While the quality of the homilies have varied widely from my viewpoint, listening is always useful and there is a cumulative weight that is significant, albeit hard to summarize.

Posted in Church | Leave a comment

Counterbalancing Politics

If one is an atheist, it seems to me one of the major challenges is to counterbalance politics. Unless, of course, one also thinks that everything is politics; however, that way lies madness and no point in trying to argue in that case.

Now, I’m using atheism in a very broad sense. Buddhism and Confucianism are, to my way of thinking, religions and their adherents are not atheists.  I’m also reminded that the Roman pagans sometimes thought Christians were atheists and that Socrates was sentenced to death for his impiety.

So, if one is an atheist but realizes the need to counterbalance politics, where will one find the counterbalance?  A recent interview with Camilla Paglia gives one common answer:  art or culture in general.  I don’t think that works; nevertheless I admire at least the recognition that there does need to be some sort of major counterbalance to politics. I also note that Paglia has a new collection of essays out:  Provocations: Collected Essays on Art, Feminism, Politics, Sex, and Education

 

Posted in Church | Leave a comment

Synodality

It seems clear that the purpose of synodality is to insert an authoritative structure between Pope and Bishops.  Argument can be made that this is needed due to growth of the Church. However, by inserting a bureaucratic organization between the Pope and the Bishop, it would fundamentally alter the nature of the Church in a way that seems to be without Biblical warrant and for that matter without warrant in Christian tradition. Occasionally called Councils are one thing and even then fraught with problems.  However, a bureaucratic structure is not personally and individually responsive to God’s promptings in the way that the individual, chosen by God, has been in the Tradition, both as recorded in Scripture and as expressed in the tradition of the Church.
    Furthermore, the Church’s recent inability to cope with issues of sexuality and fiscal responsibility and Pope Francis’ tendency to cast any criticism as demonic persecution prompts one to be rather skeptical of this major reorganization effort.

Links:

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/cti_documents/rc_cti_20180302_sinodalita_en.html

https://laciviltacattolica.com/the-synodal-church/

http://www.ncregister.com/blog/edward-pentin/final-draft-of-document-thrusts-the-issue-of-synodality-to-the-fore

 

Posted in Church | Leave a comment

European Timeline

 

Saint Francis 1181/1182 – 3 October 1226

St Thomas Aquinas 1225 – 7 March 1274

Dante Alighieri 1265 – 1321

Giotto 1267 – January 8, 1337

Great Famine 1315–1322

Black Plague 1347-1352

Chaucer 1343 – 25 October 1400

St Catherine of Siena 1347-1380

Brunelleschi 1377 – April 15, 1446

Henry V  16 September 1386 – 31 August 1422

Gutenberg 1400  – February 3, 1468

Columbus 1451 – 20 May 1506

Machiavelli 3 May 1469 – 21 June 1527

Martin Luther 10 November 1483– 18 February 1546

Henry VIII 28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547

Council of Trent 1545-1563

Michelangelo 6 March 1475 – 18 February 1564

St Teresa of Avila 1515-1582

Palestrina 1525 – 2 February 1594

Cervantes 1547 (assumed) – 22 April 1616

Galileo 5 February 1564– 8 January 1642

Shakespeare 26 April 1564 (baptized) – 23 April 1616

Monteverdi 15 May 1567 (baptized) – 29 November 1643

Newton 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1726/27

Vivaldi 4 March 1678 – 28 July 1741

Bach 1685 – 28 July 1750

Posted in Church | Leave a comment

Honky-Tonk Gospel

While I often listen to music for entertainment, I prefer music that helps me think about the human condition, especially in the light of the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. For this, Bob Dylan’s honky-tonk gospel is my main playlist.  Furthermore, although Dylan’s early music is great, summarized in say the 1961-1985 survey Biograph, this honky-tonk gospel really only comes to the fore with his 1997 album Time Out of Mind, with its wonderful Passion sequence.

Lots of recordings of concerts are available via http://dimeadozen.org and are particularly interesting in their variety.  When I’m in my Jeep, I generally listen to one of his commercial albums, for example:

  1. Bootleg #5, Rolling Thunder Revue
  2. Biograph
  3. The Music Which Inspired Girl from the North Country
  4. Toronto &  Earls Court (Disk 6 & 8, Bootleg #13)
  5. Oh Mercy
  6. Bootleg #8, Tell-Tale Signs
  7. Time Out of Mind
  8. Modern Times

Currently, I’m expecting not rain but a forthcoming album of new Dylan songs.

Well, the last thing I remember before I stripped and knelled
Was that trainload of fools bogged down in a magnetic field
A gypsy with a broken flag and a flashing ring
Said, “Son, this ain’t a dream no more, it’s the real thing”

Señor, Señor, you know their hearts is as hard as leather
Well, give me a minute, let me get it together
I just gotta pick myself up off the floor
I’m ready when you are, Señor

 

Posted in Church | Leave a comment